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Med-IQ
Journal Supplement Journal Supplement

Diagnosing and Managing Parkinson’s Disease: Practical Strategies for the Federal Healthcare Professional


Time to Complete:
60 Minutes
Released:
4/26/11
Expires:
4/25/12

Maximum Credits:

1.0

Journal Supplement Journal Supplement
Time to Complete:
60 Minutes

Released:
4/26/11

Expires:
4/25/12

Maximum Credits:
1.0
Share on:
Journal Supplement Journal Supplement

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Time to Complete:
60 Minutes
Released:
4/26/11
Expires:
4/25/12


Maximum Credits:
1.0


Overview: Each year, the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) treats an estimated 40,000 Veterans with Parkinson’s disease (PD). This number, as well as the burden imposed on the VA system, is expected to increase substantially due to the recent ruling that added PD to the list of presumed service-related disorders for Veterans who served in combat roles in Vietnam. This policy shift is based on evidence suggesting that Agent Orange exposure may increase the risk of PD. Because patients present at different stages of the disease and with varying levels of symptom severity, PD treatment must be highly individualized and requires consideration of multiple patient-specific factors. This educational activity is designed to help clinicians in the federal healthcare system become more confident and competent in the recognition, diagnosis, and optimal management of this complex disease.

CME Information:

Learning Objectives
Upon completion, participants should be able to:

  • Recognize the impact of PD on healthcare systems and understand the ramifications of recent Federal regulation changes on PD care in the VA system
  • List the common signs and symptoms associated with PD
  • Describe the primary disorders and clinical features that should be considered and identified in the differential diagnosis of PD
  • Summarize expert recommendations and recent clinical evidence regarding optimal treatment strategies in PD
  • Identify challenges associated with non-motor and treatment-related symptoms in PD and integrate effective methods for screening, diagnosis, and treatment

Authors
John Duda, MD
Director
Parkinson's Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center
Assistant Professor of Neurology
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Philadelphia, PA

Richard Robinson
Sherborn, MA

Activity Planners
Allison Gardner, PhD
Clinical Content Manager
Med-IQ
Baltimore, MD

Rebecca L. Julian, MS
Associate Managing Editor
Med-IQ
Baltimore, MD

Target Audience
This activity is intended for physicians, clinical pharmacists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, psychologists, and nurses who manage the health of 16 million beneficiaries in the federal healthcare system, including the VA and the military through all branches of service in the Department of Defense.

Series Overview/Statement of Need
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive, neurodegenerative disease characterized by hallmark signs of bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor, and gait disturbances. It is superseded only by Alzheimer’s disease as the most common neurodegenerative disorder. The prevalence of PD increases with age, and this is a growing concern as longer life expectancies in many populations, including in the United States (US), result in an increased need for healthcare resources.

The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) treats an estimated 40,000 Veterans with PD each year, and the disease imposes a relatively heavy burden on both Veterans and the VA. To improve care for this growing population of Veterans suffering from PD, the VA established six Parkinson’s Disease Research, Education, and Clinical Centers (PADRECCs) in 2001 to offer state-of-the-art treatment of PD and other movement disorders, as well as to provide education for both the professional community and patients.

The robust research efforts carried out by the federal government is especially important in light of the recent policy amendment that added PD to the list of diseases presumed to be service related for Veterans who served in combat roles in Vietnam, based on evidence suggesting that Agent Orange exposure may increase the risk of PD. This development holds important implications for healthcare delivery systems in general, and the VA in particular; the likely influx of PD patients demands that federal practitioners are up-to-date on evidence-based strategies to recognize and manage this complex disease.

Accreditation/Designation Statements
Med-IQ is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Med-IQ designates this activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Med-IQ is accredited by the California Board of Registered Nursing to provide continuing education to nurses.

Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider number CEP 14745, for 1.0 contact hours.

ACPEMed-IQ is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

1.0 contact hour (0.10 CEU) of credit for pharmacists. ACPE #0476-0000-11-004-H01-P. This knowledge-based activity is designed for all pharmacists.

Statement of Participation
Nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other healthcare professionals who successfully complete the activity will receive a Statement of Participation indicating the maximum credits available.

Medium and Method of Participation
This complimentary CME/CE activity consists of a 1.0-credit publication. To receive credit, each participant must read the introductory CME material, read the publication, and complete the post-test, attestation, and evaluation.

Original Release Date: April 26, 2011
Expiration Date: April 25, 2012
Estimated Time to Complete This Activity: 1.0 hour

Disclosure Policy
Med-IQ requires any person in a position to control the content of an educational activity to disclose all relevant financial relationships with any commercial interest. The ACCME defines “relevant financial relationships” as those in any amount occurring within the past 12 months, including those of a spouse/life partner, that could create a conflict of interest (COI). Individuals who refuse to disclose will not be permitted to contribute to this CME activity in any way. Med-IQ has policies in place that will identify and resolve COIs prior to this educational activity. Med-IQ also requires faculty to disclose discussions of investigational products or unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or devices regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration.

Disclosure Statement
The content of this publication has been peer reviewed and has been approved for compliance. The faculty and contributors have indicated the following financial relationships, which have been resolved through an established COI resolution process, and have stated that these reported relationships will not have any impact on their ability to provide unbiased content.

John Duda, MD, has indicated no real or apparent conflicts and has received no compensation for participating in the development of this activity.

The writer (Richard Robinson), activity planners (Allison Gardner and Rebecca L. Julian), and other employees of Med-IQ have no financial relationships to disclose.

Statement of Evidence-Based Content
Educational activities that assist physicians in carrying out their professional responsibilities more effectively and efficiently are consistent with the ACCME definition of CME. As an ACCME-accredited provider of CME, it is the policy of Med-IQ to review and ensure that all the content and any recommendations, treatments, and manners of practicing medicine in CME activities are scientifically based, valid, and relevant to the practice of medicine. Med-IQ is responsible for validating the content of the CME activities it provides. Specifically, (1) all recommendations addressing the medical care of patients must be based on evidence that is scientifically sound and recognized as such within the profession; (2) all scientific research referred to, reported, or used in CME in support or justification of a patient care recommendation must conform to generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis.

Med-IQ is not liable for any decision made or action taken in reliance upon the information provided through this activity.

Disclaimer
The information provided through this CME/CE activity is for continuing education purposes only and is not meant to substitute for the independent medical judgment of a physician relative to diagnostic and treatment options of a specific patient’s medical condition.

ADA Statement
Med-IQ fully complies with the legal requirements of the ADA and the rules and regulations thereof. If any participant in this educational activity is in need of accommodations, please contact the Director of CME at 443 543 5200.

Hardware/Software Requirements
Operating System
Microsoft Windows® 2000, XP, Vista
Mac OS 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 10.4

Browser
Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.5 or later
Firefox 1.5
Netscape 7 or later

PDF Viewer
Adobe Acrobat Reader® or Adobe Reader
Download the latest version at http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html

Connection Type
High bandwidth (300k) is strongly recommended
Low bandwidth (100k) results in less than optimal quality
Dial-up/modem is not recommended

Acknowledgment of Commercial Support
This activity is supported by an educational grant from Teva Pharmaceuticals.

Copyright
© 2011 Med-IQ®. All rights reserved.


Unless otherwise indicated, photographed subjects who appear within the content of this activity or on artwork associated with this activity are models; they are not actual patients or doctors.

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